Category Archives: Education

The Impact of Education in 8 Movements

March 14, 2012, by

Education is a valuable characteristic in all of our lives, and it travels in different ways. In this course, I was able to think critically about my future applications in college and further using education as a personal development experience.

We featured these 8 categories to break down the concepts that follow education:

Enrichment
Do It Yourself (DIY)
College/University
Experiential
Online
Vocational
Military
Religious

I developed this video as a feature presentation to summarize the thoughts and experiences gained from my Education in 8 Movements course.




Education in 8 Movements: Colleges & Universities

March 13, 2012, by

Our ‘Education in 8 Movements’ (IntegratedEnglish-History) class studied “Colleges & Universities” as post-secondary learning options. We looked at various iterations of the classical route to better jobs through higher education, and used effective research and analysis to achieve a fact-based understanding of the broad array of intelligent,post-secondary schooling options. Below are a few of my thoughts on our subject of inquiry.

In this unit, I achieved a deep understanding ofthe things that motivate the design of functional, meaningful architecture in college/university environments. I imagined a campus facility that reflected some of my values. Here is my creation.

   
Many films have parodied the college experience. Far fewer have presented the noble, scholarly side of higher education. Here are a few things about college/university life that I admire and may get involved in in the near future. 
In a New Yorker (June 6, 2011) article by Louis Menand, a student asks his college professor, “Why did we have to buy this book?” Menand declares this a great question. Here are my ideas,

In an effort to become more “college-ready,” we deconstructed some historical fiction. We studied Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. Of particular interest was Dickens’ opening-line use of anaphora, the repetition of a phrase in consecutive clauses (“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”). We used anaphora to comment on our own contemporary, seesawing society (*for every yin, we offered a yang!). Finally, we used this literary device to predict the future.

The following report conveys some of my excitement and reservations, hopes and fears, etc. about college/university life.
For more of my thoughts on College/University Education and beyond, please follow me on Twitter @GCEstudent_GL and join our learning community in conversation at #GCEeducation and #GCEcollegeEDU.


Education in 8 Movements – College Life : Milestone 3

March 5, 2012, by

Our ‘Education in 8 Movements’ (IntegratedEnglish-History) class studied “Colleges & Universities” as post-secondary learning options. We looked at various iterations of the classical route to better jobs through higher education, and used effective research and analysis to achieve a fact-based understanding of the broad array of intelligent,post-secondary schooling options. Below are a few of my thoughts on our subject of inquiry.

In this unit, I achieved a deep understanding of the things that motivate the design of functional, meaningful architecture in college/university environments. I imagined a campus facility that reflected some of my values. Here is my creation.
https://docs.google.com/a/gcechicago.com/present/edit?id=0AY8RoBwptT4MZGY3ZjNkdHRfNzZnNmQ0bnRjNg


Many films have parodied the college experience. Far fewer have presented the noble, scholarly side of higher education. Here are a few things about college/university life that I admire and may get involved in in the near future. 

 

 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_B2sdDvLcI&feature=player_embedded
 
In a New Yorker (June 6, 2011) article by Louis Menand, a student asks his college professor, “Why did we have to buy this book?” Menand declares this a great question. Here’s why I agree/disagree.



In an effort to become more “college-ready,” we deconstructed some historical fiction. We studied Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. Of particular interest was Dickens’ opening-line use of anaphora, the repetition of a phrase in consecutive clauses (“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”). We used anaphora to comment on our own contemporary, seesawing society (*for every yin, we offered a yang!). Finally, we used this literary device to predict the future. The following report conveys some of my excitement and reservations, hopes and fears, etc. about college/university life.

 

 



For more of my thoughts on College/University Education and beyond, please follow me on Twitter @GCEstudent_HP and join our learning community in conversation at #GCEeducation and #GCEcollegeEDU.

 





College & University

March 4, 2012, by

Our ‘Education in 8 Movements’ (IntegratedEnglish-History) class studied “Colleges & Universities” as post-secondarylearning options. We looked at various iterations of the classical route tobetter jobs through higher education, and used effective research and analysis toachieve a fact-based understanding of the broad array of intelligent,post-secondary schooling options. Below are a few of my thoughts on our subjectof inquiry.

In this unit, I achieved a deep understanding ofthe things that motivate the design of functional, meaningful architecture incollege/university environments. I imagined a campus facility that reflectedsome of my values. Here is my creation.

Y of U from dede on Vimeo.

Many films have parodied the college experience. Far fewer have presented the noble, scholarly side of higher education. Here are a few things about college/university life that I admire and may get involved in in the near future. 

In a New Yorker (June 6, 2011) article by Louis Menand, a student asks his college professor, Why did we have to buy this book?” Menand declares this a great question. Here’s why I agree: 

In an effort to become more “college-ready,” we deconstructed some historical fiction. We studied Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. Of particular interest was Dickens’ opening-line use of anaphora, the repetition of a phrase in consecutive clauses (“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”). We used anaphora to comment on our own contemporary, seesawing society (*for every yin, we offered a yang!). Finally, we used this literary device to predict the future. The following report conveys some of my excitement and reservations, hopes and fears, etc. about college/university life.

For more of my thoughts on College/University Education and beyond, please follow me on Twitter @GCEstudent_DC and join our learning community in conversation at #GCEeducation and #GCEcollegeEDU.

 

 



Robot Building Milestone 3

February 27, 2012, by

1) Describe your experiences with the NASA robot project.

My experience with the NASA robot project was great. The school worked so well together as a team. We started off as the underdogs having no idea what to do and slowly made process. In the end, we could all see the process we had made together and watched this robot form. It felt like watching a child of yours grow up and go off to college. I can’t wait to see how our robot does.

2) What did you learn? What did you learn about yourself?

While being part of this robot project, I learned a lot about my classmates as individuals. I also learned about patience and persevering through a lot of challenges. The most important thing I learned about myself was that I enjoy building things. If I hadn’t stepped outside my comfort zone, I might have not had the chance to actually build the robot which I truly enjoyed.

3) What could you have done differently?

I think I could have defiantly devoted more time to this project. While working with robots,  it took much of my time. I learned that these kinds of projects takes a lot of devotion and patience.

4) What was the greatest challenge?

The greatest challange at first was working with everyone. It was a struggle at first for my classmates. It took a few days into the project for us to all really get into. Then we had the problem of combining our individual ideas.  In the end, we all worked together and really enjoyed this project.

5) What did you enjoy the most?

I enjoyed being able to work with my classmates to see how great and supportive they all are. I also enjoyed the process of starting a project from scratch and see it grow in only a few weeks.This school as a community really devoted so much time into building and it was great to see the finished product.

6) How does this experience or robot technology help find solutions to the united nations millennium development goals?

Robot technology can help find a solution for many different millennium goals we have. A millennium goal that we can use is to help produce universal education. Having a robot could help kids in other countries receive a good education. The robot could talk to the kids and teach them just like any other teacher would. By doing this we could go into dangerous countries. We also would be able to get more help instead of using volunteers, and help as many of these kids as we can. This way these kids get the education they deserve.



ED8: Enrichment Education

February 21, 2012, by

Our ‘Education in 8 Movements’ (Integrated English-History) class studied “Enrichment” as a post-secondary learning option. We examined how motivation and executive functioning skills contribute to effective habits of mind. Below are a few of my thoughts on our subject of inquiry.

While studying different ways of learning, I learned that I was a linguistic learner. I have known this for quite some time but now I can label it because of the quiz our class took on edutopia.org. Linguistic learner thrive through conversation and discussion. I love being able to talk through a project or concept because it helps me get a firm grasp on the idea. I never find myself at a loss for words.

Linguistic Learner from Z S on Vimeo.

 

 

During this Unit on Enrichment, I read some of Christopher Hitchens’ Letters to a Young Contrarian and composed my own argument/motto for learning and living intelligently: “Passion is hard work that feels easy”

 

My classmates and I studied Sir Ken Robinson’s The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything. In striving to live a passionate and purposeful life, I’ve reflected on some things that I love to do, and things that I’m really good at. Here’s a recording of me talking about one of things I love to do:

Of course, I also love to read. Here’s a recording of me reading from one of my favorite books: “Me Talk Pretty One Day” by David Sedaris.

 

Reading has enriched my life!

For more of my thoughts on Enrichment Education and beyond, please follow me on Twitter @GCEstudent_DC  and join our learning community in conversation at #GCEeducation and #GCEenrichmentEDU.

 




Milestone 2 – 8 Movements of Education : DIY

February 9, 2012, by

Our ‘Education in 8 Movements’ (Integrated English-History) class studied “Do It Yourself (DIY)” as a post-secondary learning option. We examined the challenges and benefits of a self-directed education from multiple perspectives, including autobiography. Below are a few of my thoughts on our subject of inquiry.

While studying Ayn Rand’s The Romantic Manifesto, I learned how character is shaped by values, and how our sense of life is informed by our emotional response to nature. Meanwhile, I reflected on some physical things I value, and how these influencers reveal my character. Learning to fail is essential if you want to succeed. These mistakes need to be made in environments suited for them, however failure is the greatest teaching tool.

During this Unit on DIY, I read some of The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. Like Franklin, I created a chart of 13 unique virtues and measured self-improvement on a daily basis. I grew most from my commitment to becoming a better leader because I hold that role on my team and I need to become more vocal and assertive, building on my philosophy of leading by example.

My classmates and I studied Frederick Douglass’ famous lecture, “Self-Made Men.” Mr. Douglass believed that success is achieved not through luck, but by another word: work. Here are my thoughts.

I checked out Anya Kamenetz’s book DIY-U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education. As a result, I’m exploring education alternatives, including DIY options.

There are a number of people succeeding via the School of DIY on a local, national, and global level. Here are my thoughts on a few who inspire me.

For more of my thoughts on DIY Education and beyond, please follow me on Twitter @GCEstudent_HP here and join our learning community in conversation at #GCEeducation and #GCEdoityourselfEDU.




My “Do it Yourself” Movement

February 9, 2012, by

Our ‘Education in 8 Movements’ (Integrated English-History) class studied “Do It Yourself (DIY)” as a post-secondary learning option. We examined the challenges and benefits of a self-directed education from multiple perspectives, including autobiography. Below are a few of my thoughts on our subject of inquiry.

While studying Ayn Rand’s The Romantic Manifesto, I learned how character is shaped by values, and how our sense of life is informed by our emotional response to nature. Meanwhile, I reflected on some physical things I value, and how these influencers reveal my character.

During this Unit on DIY, I read some of The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. Like Franklin, I created a chart of 13 unique virtues and measured self-improvement on a daily basis. I grew most from my commitment to resolution because there are many different goals I want to set out for myself, and in my past I know that I often have failed to fully commit myself to them. I seek change everyday in order to re-work my goals and focus on them more often.

My classmates and I studied Frederick Douglass’ famous lecture, “Self-Made Men.” Mr. Douglass believed that success is achieved not through luck, but by another word: work. Here are my thoughts.

I checked out Anya Kamenetz’s book DIY-U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education. As a result, I’m exploring education alternatives, including DIY options.



School of DIY (Do it Yourself)

February 8, 2012, by

Our ‘Education in 8 Movements’ (Integrated English-History) class studied “Do It Yourself (DIY)” as a post-secondary learning option. We examined the challenges and benefits of a self-directed education from multiple perspectives, including autobiography. Below are a few of my thoughts on our subject of inquiry.

While studying Ayn Rand’s The Romantic Manifesto, I learned how character is shaped by values, and how our sense of life is informed by our emotional response to nature. Meanwhile, I reflected on some physical things I value, and how these influences reveal my character.

Untitled from dede on Vimeo.

During this Unit on DIY, I read some of The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. Like Franklin, I created a chart of 13 unique virtues and measured self-improvement on a daily basis. I grew most from my commitment to listen because I learned that I can learn so much more about others and myself by listening to what they have to say and seeing how their opinions inform or change my own.

My classmates and I studied Frederick Douglass’ famous lecture, “Self-Made Men.” Mr. Douglass believed that success is achieved not through luck, but by another word: work. Here are my thoughts.

 

I checked out Anya Kamenetz’s book DIY-U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education. As a result, I’m exploring education alternatives, including DIY options.

There are a number of people succeeding via the School of DIY on a local, national, and global level. Here are my thoughts on a few who inspire me.

For more of my thoughts on DIY Education and beyond, please follow me on Twitter @GCEstudent_DC and join our learning community in conversation at #GCEeducation and #GCEdoityourselfEDU.





Do It Yourself (DIY) and Self-Making- 8 Movements Education

February 8, 2012, by

Our ‘Education in 8 Movements’ (Integrated English-History) class studied “Do It Yourself (DIY)” as a post-secondary learning option. We examined the challenges and benefits of a self-directed education from multiple perspectives, including autobiography. 

While studying Ayn Rand’s The Romantic Manifesto, I learned how character is shaped by values, and how our sense of life is informed by our emotional response to nature. Meanwhile, I reflected on some physical things I value, and how these influencers reveal my character. 

During this Unit on DIY, I read some of The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. Like Franklin, I created a chart of 13 unique virtues and measured self-improvement on a daily basis. I grew most from my commitment to order because I believe with out order chaos comes along and with chaos nothing will be able to get done.